God

Fourth Day

Imagine with me for a minute.

It’s Monday.

You and your best friend are walking home.

On your way home to Emmaus the two of you talk about the extraordinary weekend you’ve just experienced. Trying to make sense of it. Searching for some meaning. Some understanding. Some answers to your questions.

As you talk about the events of the weekend, a man approaches and begins speaking with you, but you don’t recognize him. As you approach Emmaus, beginning with Moses and with the prophets the man explains to you the things concerning Jesus and all the Scriptures. You become so enthralled by the things he’s telling you that you urge him to stay with you and tell you more.

At the dinner table the man takes the bread, blesses it, and breaking it, he gives it to you. Then this man who has enlightened you all day with amazing facts and knowledge of the Scriptures reveals himself to you and you realize it is Jesus. Then He vanishes from your sight. Your heart burns within you because of the wonderful things Jesus told you.

Wow! What a fourth day! The Savior of the world spends a day with you teaching you and your friend all about Him and what the Scriptures mean.

What do you suppose was in the minds and hearts of Cleopas and his friend when they met Jesus on the road to Emmaus and their hearts burned within them? I wonder how Jesus’ resurrection affected them and their lives after their fourth day. (Luke 24:13-35).

How is your fourth day going? Most likely every Evangelical Christian pastor reflected on the Resurrection story in some fashion Sunday. You’ve heard the story every Easter. Probably, if you belong to a Bible teaching church, you’ve heard versions of it, or what it means to us, in messages from your pastor throughout the year.

Are you different today than you were yesterday? Did the Resurrection message impact you? Or was it just the same Resurrection story you’ve heard before? Does it still have the same meaning as it did the first time you heard it? Does your heart burn within you when you think about the events of that weekend? From His crucifixion on Friday, to His resurrection on Sunday, to His appearing to Cleopas and his friend on the fourth day?

I belong to a group called the North Georgia Walk To Emmaus. We plan and carry out spiritual retreat weekends each year at our campgrounds. Emmaus communities exist all across the country. One of the highlights at the end of each weekend is to convey the meaning of our Fourth Day. Our Fourth Day (the Monday after the weekend ends on Sunday) is a time to reflect on what the weekend and our relationship to Jesus means to us. One thing almost everyone associated with a weekend will tell you is, “I never knew Jesus loved me that much.”

That’s the meaning of Resurrection Sunday. To celebrate how much Jesus loves us. And to praise Him for dying for our sins on Friday and rising to guarantee us eternal life on Sunday.

Do you know how much Jesus loves you? Will you live today (your fourth day) like you lived last week? Or will you live out how Jesus changed your life as you celebrated His life yesterday?

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12 thoughts on “Fourth Day

  1. Wonderful article! Thanks!
    Just one thing though. The walk to Emmaus was before sundown on the first day of the week (i.e. Sunday). Now that would make it the third day. In Luke 24:1, it is written, “On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb.” The first day of the Jewish week was Sunday, Saturday being the Sabbath.
    And then again in Luke 24:13, it is written, “Now that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles[a] from Jerusalem.” So it is clear that the walk to Emmaus took place on the same day as Easter i.e. third day.

    Apart from this small observation, i was really inspired by the article.
    God bless.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so grateful that you were blessed and for your comment about the timing of the travelers on the road to Emmaus. Wouldn’t you have loved to be one of them?

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  2. Wonderful article! Thanks!
    Just one thing though. The walk to Emmaus was before sundown on the first day of the week (i.e. Sunday). Now that would make it the third day. In Luke 24:1, it is written, “On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb.” And then again in Luke 24:13, it is written, “Now that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles[a] from Jerusalem.” So it is clear that the walk to Emmaus took place on the same day as Easter i.e. third day.
    Apart from this small observation, i was really inspired by the article.
    God bless.

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    1. I’m grateful that God touched you with the message He gave me to write. And thanks for the insight on the walk ti Emmaus. I always want to be true to Scripture. God bless.

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  3. Steve, how excited I am about your honoring of “Fourth Day” as the followup (mirroring the walk to Emmaus) of the spiritual retreat system know as The Walk to Emmaus, which is EXACTLY like, in every detail, the Crusillo Movement Retreats as practiced by the Episcopal Church and The Roman Catholics (and I think? the Lutherans). I am a Crusillo graduate and now, a returned Methodist, in fellowship with the Walk to Emmaus graduates. Hooray for your work there in North Georgia! Walking and dining with Jesus–what a privilege He gives us by the power of the Holy Spirit!

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    1. Wow! Isn’t it exciting to meet brothers and sisters who have been on the Emmaus Road together and dined with Jesus and broken bread with Him. I have a dear friend who is an assistant principal at an elementary school here who just got back from a special Crusillo weekend just before our Spring break. I can’t wait to chat with him about his weekend with Jesus. I am a recovering Methodist :>)
      (Baptist now) but there are no denominations at Christ’s table. God bless you.

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    1. Thanks so much for connecting and visiting my blog. I have been on a a walk and have worked on four different Emmaus Walk teams. Working on a walk is almost as amazing as my walk.Tell me about your walk. I participated in Blue Lake Walk #34 in Andalusia, Alabama in 1987. Table of John.

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      1. Mine was E85. I think they are in the 300’s now. The man that invited me did what he was supposed to do, but I felt so in the dark. I had no idea of what was going to happen. To be honest, within about an hour of being there I felt very betrayed and angry. At some point shortly there after, I found that one of our guys is a table leader and part of the team. The turn around for me came after I decided that I needed to throw myself into this as an act of worship. After that it turned into one of the richest experiences I have ever had. The event that moved me the deepest was the foot washing. I had one of the leaders come to me and say, “I want what you have.”
        What I have and had even then was a relationship with the Living God, in the person of Jesus. I just happen to throw myself into him, with some frequency. I don’t remember the table. The year might have been around 1996.
        I love it so much, especially the cooks. They spent so much time praying for us, and I think that may have made the difference. They really seemed to care about us. I forgot the flower shower and all those letters of encouragement.

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      2. Resmo,
        Thanks for the info. I’ve heard of pilgrims coming to walks who were in turmoil or angry as well. Isn’t it wonderful how God turns us towards Him when He wants to get through to us? Thanks for the update. Let’s stay in touch.

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  4. What an important reminder…not to make Easter and the Resurrection a ‘stop off’ point, but to take hold of a joy that lasts forever! Amen to Emmaus encounters with the Living God!

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