A Personal Relationship With God, abiding in Christ, change, changes, choices, God, God's love, God's omnipotence, God's Sovereignty, God's Will, God's Word, Grace, Grace / Mercy, growth, Obedience, Relationship With God, showing love, Truth

“Pick up your mat and walk.”

When Jesus encountered a man who had been afflicted for 38 years, He gave him three commands: Get up; pick up your mat; and walk.

if I make a conscious, deliberate decision to get up, to obey Jesus, to do what Jesus tells me to do, my life will change. It’s a lot easier, and more comfortable sometimes, to remain where we are. To remain in the grasp of a place we don’t want to be, but don’t have the courage, or the faith, to do what Jesus tells us to do.

Like the sick man Jesus encountered, I need to make an effort to change, especially if I’m lounging on a mat of my own creation. I have to want to get well. I need to obey Jesus’ command. The man needed to take action.

Then Jesus told the man to pick up his mat. John 5:9 says, “Immediately the man became well.”

I’d be willing to wager he showed that mat to everyone he met, skipping through the streets testifying to how Jesus had healed him. His mat became his message. God used the man’s 38 years of affliction as his testimony to God’s faithfulness and powers of healing.

Finally, Jesus told the man to walk. It was finally time for him to act. Once Jesus has touched us, impacted our lives and healed us, He wants us to walk out our testimonies. To share our healing with others.

I am a victim of post traumatic stress disorder, PTSD. We experienced a homicide in our home November 10, 2013. Following the murder the PTSD set in and it took several months of weekly counseling for me to work through it. When I did, I shared my story in recovery groups, church groups and with others who experienced PTSD. I walked my story out and could tell others, “I know how you feel.” Because I did. I was able to share understanding and compassion with them. And others shared their stories with me as well. We share a bond that others can’t share. But as we walk out our experience, we grow stronger and closer to the Lord. I am forever grateful for all the things God showed me as I lay on that mat.

Maybe someday I’ll write about all that.

If you missed the post, “Get up”, you can read it here.
If you missed the post, “Pick up your mat”, you can read it here.
If you’d like to read about the homicide and the source of my PTSD,  You can read the full post here.

God, God's Sovereignty, God's Will, Guest Blogger, Identity In Christ, Life, The Gospel

What Do People Remember?

By Dr. John Ed Mathison
Executive Director
John Ed Mathison Leadership Ministries

How do we want to be remembered? As people think about their relationship with us in the past, what do they remember? What is our legacy? If someone had to place some words on our tombstone, what would those words be? Continue reading

God, Jesus, Life, Obedience, The Gospel

See You At The Top (In Heaven), Zig

Zig Ziglar was an American icon. He embodied the best of faith in Jesus Christ. His contributions to True Believers’ faith and motivational speaking (grounded in the Gospel) are unparalleled.

Many of his quotes are classic positive examples of motivation for anyone in any field of endeavor.  Here are a few of his most memorable quotes followed by his obituary written by Jamie Stengle for the Associated Press.

  • There are no traffic jams on the extra mile.
  • Every choice you make has an end result.
  • Positive thinking will let you do everything better than negative thinking will.
  • A goal properly set is halfway reached.
  • People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.
  • If you learn from defeat, you haven’t really lost.
  • The foundation stones for a balanced success are honesty, character, integrity, faith, love and loyalty.
  • Positive thinking will let you do everything better than negative thinking will.
  • If you treat your wife like a thoroughbred, you’ll never end up with a nag.
  • (And my person favorite Zig Ziglar quote): You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want.

Zig Ziglar obituary

By JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press

DALLAS — Motivational speaker Zig Ziglar, who wrote more than 30 books and focused on positivity and leading a balanced life, died Wednesday, November 28, in Texas. He was 86.zig

Ziglar, who had been suffering from pneumonia, died at a hospital in the Dallas suburb of Plano, said his personal assistant, Jay Hellwig.

With an aim at helping people achieve success in their careers and personal lives, in addition to a focus on Christianity, Ziglar was a prolific speaker who appeared at events alongside world leaders including several U.S. presidents and former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

“Mr. Ziglar was the same guy behind the closed doors as he was preparing for his presentations to thousands of people that he was when we were sitting at the kitchen table and he was reading the newspaper,” Hellwig said.

Prestonwood Baptist Church Pastor Jack Graham, Ziglar’s friend and pastor, said Ziglar “truly was filled with faith.”

“He was positive. He was hopeful. You just never heard negativity from Zig Ziglar,” Graham said. “It wasn’t just something he did on a platform. This was who he was. This is how he lived his life. And he helped so many people.”

“He was a leader of leaders and a mentor of mentors and all that you can say,” he added.

Ziglar started his fulltime career in motivational speaking when he was in his 40s. His first book was “See You at the Top.”

Hellwig said Ziglar “accepted Jesus Christ as his savior” at the age of 45 and “ever since, that day is what he said was the turning point of his life.”

“He also had the uncanny ability to make everyone he ran into feel like they were his friend,” Hellwig said.

Ziglar was a World War II veteran who grew up in Yazoo City, Miss., and then went to work in sales for a series of companies, where his interest in motivational speaking grew, according to his Plano-based company’s website. Hellwig said Ziglar moved to Dallas in the late 1960s.

Ziglar’s company, which features more than a dozen speakers advocating the “Ziglar Way,” offers motivation and performance training.

His book, “Confessions of a Grieving Christian,” was written after the 1995 death of his oldest daughter, Suzan Ziglar Witmeyer, at the age of 46.

After a 2007 fall down a flight of stairs left him with a brain injury, Ziglar, along with another daughter, Julie Ziglar Norman, wrote “Embrace the Struggle,” a book that described how his life changed after the injury.

In addition to his daughter, Ziglar is survived by his wife Jean, with whom he celebrated 66 years of marriage on Monday; his son, Tom Ziglar; and daughter Cindy Ziglar Oates.